GLUTAMINE

Product
Glutamine sources include:
* Cabbage * Beetroot * Beef * Chicken
* Fish * Legumes * Dairy products

FUNCTIONS

The beneficial effects of products rich in glutamine:

  • Maintain the health of the small intestine;
  • Help the body to produce glutathione, the main oxidative nutrient;
  • Provide the proper balance of acids and bases in the body;
  • Help to preserve the muscle mass.

Which indications require consumption of more products rich in glutamine?

  • Regular physical exercises with high intensity;
  • Dysbiosis of the gastrointestinal system, including irritable bowel syndrome;
  • Frequent colds or flu;
  • Severe burns;
  • Low share of muscle mass or muscle failure.

THE IMPACT OF STORAGE, COOKING AND PROCESSING

Studies have shown that the storage, processing or cooking have no negative effect on the glutamine in the products.

PUBLIC HEALTH RECOMMENDATIONS

The National Academy of Sciences have not established the reference dietary values for the Coenzyme Q intake (DRI), neither the Tolerable Upper Intake Levels.

WHY DO WE NEED PRODUCTS RICH IN GLUTAMINE?

The glutamine is an amino acid which is synthesized from other amino acids in the body called glutamic acids or glutamates. The glutamine is sometimes called essential acid, because in certain conditions the body cannot produce sufficient amount of it, so it has to be taken through food. The glutamine is the most prevalent amino acid in the blood and the muscle tissues, and it is especially important for maintenance of the gastrointestinal and immune system’s health. In the recent years it has become more popular among athletes because of the belief that helps in the prevention of infections after the matches and in speeding up the recovery processes.

THE BENEFICIAL EFFECTS OF THE GLUTAMINE ON THE HEALTH

Maintenance of the gastrointestinal health

The glutamine is the major energy source for the cells surrounding the small intestine. Glutamine also serves as fuel for the muscle cells and immune system cells.

Other beneficial effects of the glutamine on the health

The glutamine takes part in providing proper balance of acids and bases in the body. It also serves as a precursor of the antioxidant glutathione, participates in the synthesis of glycogen and creates nitrogen compounds which are necessary for the production of nucleotides which build the DNA and RNA.

WHAT ARE THE REASONS FOR GLUTAMINE DEFICIENCY AND ITS SYMPTOMS?

Due to the body’s ability to synthesize the glutamine from the amino acid glutamate, there is no frequent occurrence of glutamine deficiency. However, its concentration in muscles and in the blood decreases rapidly when the body is faced with any form of physical stress, such as physical exercises with high intensity, injuries, operations, burns, infections and malnutrition. In these cases the body  utilizes its stock of glutamine, because it is not able quickly enough to produce the required amounts of this amino acid. Accordingly, people exposed to physical stress can be under threat of glutamine deficiency. The major site for the synthesis of glutamine is the muscle tissue. Therefore, people who suffer from muscle failures, most probably would be under threat of glutamine deficiency.

CAN WE CONSUME TOO MUCH GLUTAMINE?

There is no evidence that glutamine consumption can have a harmful effect on our health. The FDA have not established the Tolerable Upper Intake Levels for glutamine yet.

HOW DOES THE GLUTAMINE REACT WITH OTHER NUTRIENTS?

The most frequent way of creating glutamine is through the conversion of amino acid glutamate.Vitamin B3 (niacin) is needed to achieve this transformation. The glutamic acid is often synthesized by a complex reaction in which three additional molecules take part. Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is required for the conversion as well. Therefore, vitamins B3 and B6 can be considered for vitamins helpers when it comes to the sufficient amount of glutamine in the body.